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Conclusion & End Notes

Conclusion

Master Plan 96 was revealing. It demonstrated deficiencies in programs and services. Not all of those issues have been resolved. There is more work to be done. Now after over 40 year’s operation, Parkland College is faced once again with shaping its future – one that is sensitive to both students, taxpayers and the environment. This information suggests the need to continue campus development now.

There is a lot of responsibility in building a competitive campus. The intent for this plan, in the following page, is to provide a creative and effective design that integrates Parkland’s existing character and smart future growth. This phase of planning has the potential to become more than just another campus project. It offers Parkland the opportunity to expand its reputation as an amenity and resource to the surrounding community and the metropolitan areas in District 505.


END NOTES


1
Jonathan M. Astroth, 2007.

2
a. “The campus experience we tend to associate with undergraduate education does a remarkable job in preparing the student for later in life, and clearly it does so through a complex social experience extending far beyond the classroom and the curriculum.” James Duderstadt, President Emeritus, University of Michigan.
b. “In Millennials Go to College, Neil Howe and William Strauss found that students entering college around the year 2000, and their parents, ‘place enormous emphasis on the quality of campus life.’” Kenney, Dumont, & Kenney, Mission and Place, Strengthening Learning and Community through Campus Design, American Council on Education Praeger Series on Higher Education, 2005.
c. “Student involvement in campus life (a sense of community and engagement) is one of the top five conditions known to promote student retention…. An article in Strategic Enrollment Management Monthly notes, The frequency and quality of contact with faculty, staff, and other students is an important independent predictor of student persistence. This is true for large and small, rural and urban, and private and 2- and 4-year colleges and universities. It is true for women as well as men, student of color and Anglo students, and part-time and full-time students.
Student engagement is particularly important for first-years students because their connection to the institution and friendships with other student are tenuous.”
Kenney, Dumont, & Kenney, Mission and Place, Strengthening Learning and Community through Campus Design, American Council on
Education Praeger Series on Higher Education, 2005.

3
District/College Fall 2005* GSF
Truman 12,518 553,700
Wilbur Wright 11,122 587,940
Harper 15,026 1,295,692
Illinois Central 12,402 885,396
Joliet 13,022 682,665
Lake County 15,745 902,038
Moraine Valley 15,929 716,903
Oakton 11,040 589,848
Southwestern 14,479 666,286
Triton 15,845 859,828
Parkland 9,752 589,186
*Summary of Opening Fall 2005 Student
Headcount Enrollment

 

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2400 West Bradley Ave | Champaign, IL 61821 | 217.351.2200 | 800.346.8089
The Mission of Parkland College is to engage the community in learning.